3 December, 2021
by Challenge Action

Discovery on sale

Discovery on sale is the most important stage of the sale, because it’s when we understand the customer’s need, or even create that need. Discovering the need isn’t very difficult: just ask him what he’s looking for. On the other hand, it’s quite dangerous, because if they’re looking for a product or service you don’t […]

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Discovery on sale is the most important stage of the sale, because it’s when we understand the customer’s need, or even create that need.

Discovering the need isn’t very difficult: just ask him what he’s looking for. On the other hand, it’s quite dangerous, because if they’re looking for a product or service you don’t have, you risk losing your sale and seeing your customer go to a competitor to find what they’re looking for. So it’s best to take a two-step approach, and ask him what his current situation is, and what his goal is. This will create a gap between what he owns and what he dreams of, and thus increase his desire to buy.

Here are the main questions, which you can of course adapt to your own business.

Situation questions

  • Who is he, what is his civil status, does he have children, how old is he? These questions reveal whether other people are involved in the purchase, either as decision-makers or users.
  • What is his or her job, and what is his or her spouse’s job? These questions will help you better understand your financial situation.
  • What do they currently own in relation to the products they’re looking for, e.g. cars, furniture, TV, insurance, financial investments, etc.? This allows us to know where it’s coming from, so we can find something better for it.

Objective questions

  • What’s your dream
  • What is your objective
  • What motivates you
  • If you had an ideal, what would it be?

Objective questions will now create the gap between the situation and the need. If you can offer an adaptable service, you can afford to ask very specific questions such as “What is your dream?” This is easily done for beauticians, one of whose best questions is: “If I had a magic wand, what would you like to look like? Otherwise, if you sell specific products, keep it general.

Now it’s up to you to adapt your questions, or to buy one of our specific courses in which we offer the questions of top salespeople. We’ve had the opportunity to train thousands of them and adapt their best practices. The best preparation leads to the best improvisation!